Bed stuy: do or gentrify


Project statement:


To bridge the gap of qualitative research surrounding the experiences of Bed-Stuy residents in a gentrifying neighborhood.


approach:


Residents of the Bed-Stuyvesant area were approached and asked to share their positive and negative experiences living in a currently gentrified neighborhood. Their responses were recorded, and they were asked to be photographed.


MEDIUM:

  • DSLR-T6i 
  • IPHONE-X
  • 11 X 17 SEMI GLOSSY PHOTO PAPER
  • WAV AUDIO FILES
  • ADOBE CREATIVE SUITE




documentation

INTERVIEWS & PHOTOGRAPHS


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BETH SIMON

guyanese, born 1951, retired | resident of 40 years


"We had a Block Association, first time I came here, it was very good. Everybody use to go to the meeting. But that person [who headed the meeting] died away. Then we had a another one, 3 years ago, but  the [head] person [also] died.  Now have one, but it is not going good, because no one comes. The last meeting we had was last year." 




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HARRIET NANCE

american, born 1961, pastor | resident of 30 years

 

"So I think we as a community need to get involved. I need to go when there is a community meeting... I need to go when the borough president is having a meeting in his office for benefits, to talk about housing. We need to be educated, and don't be afraid to allow certain issues to come into the community. We are here and we are not going away." 



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Loreen Borne

Guyanese, born 1971, nurse | resident of 2 years


"I can tell you there are a lot of positive changes here. Number 1, crime rate has decreased, it’s so quiet now, I can actually sleep. You can see police around now too. Bed-Stuy just reminds me of Queens, the suburb area, very very quiet.” 



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patricia williams

American, born 1982, hair stylist | resident of 7 years


"The first time I moved in, there were more people that looked like me...more things that were more affordable. Certain beauty salons, that would care for more African Americans go out of business, because more finer, smoother hair, is now wanting to be taken care of.”



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sabina daniels

st. lucian , born 1980, teacher | resident of 10 years


"In terms of community change..., I think its a matter of being accepting. That we are all unique...its a matter of being open and not having preconceived notions that someone is going to do something to you. It's a matter of accepting someone, no matter the color of their skin, whether you think they belong in the community or not.”



PRINTS

11 x 17 white-framed prints, placed at NYU's IDM showcase 2019


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